The Papers of Conrad Sexton Larson in the Dartmouth College LibraryWMST Mss-223

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Larson, Conrad Sexton
Title Remainder: Papers. 1946-1973
Dates: 1946-1973
Identification: Mss-223










FOLDER : 1.

Clippings—Antarctica



FOLDER : 2.

Clippings—Deepfreeze, 1955-1957



FOLDER : 3.

Clippings—Helicopter crash, 1951



FOLDER : 4.

Clippings—Larson



FOLDER : 5.

Clippings—Plane crash, 1955



FOLDER : 6.

Messages and orders, 1956



FOLDER : 7.

Miscelleneous



FOLDER : 8.

Operation plans, 1956



FOLDER : 9.

Photographs—Airplanes



FOLDER : 10.

Photographs—Birds



FOLDER : 11.

Photographs—Color



FOLDER : 12.

Photographs—Dogs



FOLDER : 13.

Photographs—Equipment



FOLDER : 14.

Photographs—Geographical features, including aerial views



FOLDER : 15.

Photographs—Helicopters



FOLDER : 16.

Photographs—Housing



FOLDER : 17.

Photographs—Individuals



FOLDER : 18.

Photographs—Penguins



FOLDER : 19.

Photographs—Shipboard life



FOLDER : 20.

Photographs—Ships



FOLDER : 21.

Photographs—Ships and ice



FOLDER : 22.

Photographs—Whales





BIOGRAPHY - Conrad Sexton Larson

Conrad Sexton Larson was born in Winchester, Massachusetts, on July 1, 1924. He attended public schools there and was graduated from Winchester High School in 1942. During the summer of 1939 he had a taste of what was to come in his career. He spent the summer vacation working for Admiral Richard E. Byrd helping to prepare the barkentine Bear of Oakland for the 1939 expedition to Antarctica.

Larson's career in the Navy began in 1942 when he enrolled as an aviation cadet. He took his basic training at Chapel Hill and at the Naval Air Station in Glenview, Illinois. He went on to advanced training at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, and upon graduation in August of 1943, he was appointed Ensign in the Naval Reserve. He retired as a Lieutenant Commander on July 31, 1963, after 21 years of active duty.

Following his commissioning in 1943, Larson served in tours of duty at Beeville, Texas, and at Atlanta, Georgia, as an instrument flight instructor. In 1946 he was transferred to NAS Squantum, Massachusetts, where he served first as Line Maintenance Officer and then as Assistant Operations Officer. His next duty was with the U.S. Air Force for instruction in helicopters at Waco, Texas. He held helicopter designation No. 231. On graduation from the Air Force school, he was assigned to NAS Lakehurst as a helicopter pilot and then back to NAS Squantum. While on this tour of duty he distinguished himself by piloting a Navy helicopter from Squantum to San Diego, a flight of some 3,500 miles which took 62 1/2 hours of flight time. It was the longest known flight of its kind at the time.

Larson's next tour of duty took him to NAS Seattle, where he served as Flight Training Officer. It was during this time that he played an important part in the rescue of 19 survivors of a downed Army chartered DC3 which had crashed in the mountains of the state of Washington. Later, as officer-in-charge of the Navy's helicopter detachment aboard the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Eastwind, Larson served with Operation Deep Freeze 1, 1955-56. During this time he rescued seven survivors who had crashed east of Little America in February of 1956. Finding the downed aircraft 108 miles from base camp, he trekked the trail left by the survivors for a distance of 45 miles. For this action he was awarded the Air Medal. A glacier was also named for him, located at 77°28'S, 1540°00'W, which first appeared on U.S. Geological Survey map ST 5-8/5 “AIexandra Mountains.”

On his return from the Antarctic Lieutenant Commander Larson was assigned as officer-in-charge of Patrol Squadron Eight at Argentia, Newfoundland. This squadron flew patrol bombers on all-weather antisubmarine and reconnaissance missions. This tour was followed by duty at NAS South Weymouth and NAS Quonset Point His last tour of duty was in Boston on the Headquarters Staff of the First Naval District.

Lieutenant Commander Larson died at his home in Peterborough, New Hampshire on April 22, 1993.

Written by Anna Larson, February 1995

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